John Warren

Program Contact Information

Individuals interested in the program or requiring more information should contact the program director:

Dr. John Warren, Director
Graduate Program in Dental Public Health

N-337 Dental Science Building

The University of Iowa

Iowa City, IA  52242

(319) 335-7205

john-warren@uiowa.edu

Master of Science Program in Dental Public Health

Program Description

The Master of Science program in Dental Public Health is a two-year program that includes formal coursework in biostatistics, epidemiology, health care policy and management, environmental health and behavioral sciences, as well as a field experience component.  The program requires completion of a minimum of 40 semester hours of academic credit, as well as completion of a thesis based on original research.  The program also requires successful completion of a comprehensive examination after completing the first year of the program.  The program is designed be completed in about 22 months (e.g., begin July 1, 2022 and graduate in early May, 2024), but most students require an additional summer session to complete the thesis, so that typical time to complete the program is 25 months.  . 

The academic program starts in late June (rather than in the fall).  In consultation with the graduate program director, students will develop a plan of study, which includes a set of required courses and appropriate electives.  This course of study fulfills the requirements set forth by the Commission on Dental Accreditation for certification as a dental public health specialist by the American Board of Dental Public Health (ABDPH).  Thus, upon completion of our program, graduates are educationally qualified to take the ABDPH exam and become board-certified in Dental Public Health. 

Requirements

Applicants should have a dental degree from a U.S. dental school or international equivalent; however, there is no requirement for a Master of Public Health (MPH) or other degree prior to enrollment, as components of the MPH are included as part of the program.  Thus, there is no need to complete a separate residency after completing the program in order to become board-eligible.  The program only offers the MS degree; there is no certificate only option.  There is, however, an opportunity to pursue a Dental Public Health track within the PhD degree program in Oral Sciences that includes the training necessary to become ABDPH certified.   Dental hygienists with baccalaureate degrees are also eligible to be enrolled in the program, although they are not eligible to be certified as Dental Public Health specialists.  

Application Procedures

All applicants must have taken either the GRE or DAT examination.  International applicants must have also taken the TOEFL (or IELTS) examinations and apply by November 1 of the year prior to the intended start of the program.  U.S./Canadian applicants should take the GRE or DAT and apply by March 1, but we encourage these applicants to apply earlier, if possible. 

Applications are made online to the Graduate College at the University of Iowa - https://grad.admissions.uiowa.edu/apply.  Applicants should specify “Dental Public Health” as their area of study.  

Application and Enrollment Timetable

            Applicants selected as finalists will be invited for an in-person or telephone interview that typically occurs in December or January, followed by admission decisions soon thereafter.  Orientation is typically the last week of June, with the program starting on July 1.

Dental Public Heath Specialty and Program Information

Dental public health is one of the 12 dental specialties formally recognized by the American Dental Association.  Dental Public Health is defined as “the science and art of preventing and controlling dental diseases and promoting dental health through organized community efforts.  It is that form of dental practice that serves the community as a patient rather than the individual. It is concerned with the dental health education of the public, with applied dental research, and with the administration of group dental care programs, as well as the prevention and control of dental diseases on a community basis.”

Training in the specialty requires a minimum of 2 years of advanced education beyond dental school, and must include instruction in biostatistics, epidemiology, health care policy and management, environmental health, and behavioral sciences.  The specialty is further defined by 10 competencies developed by the American Board of Dental Public Health.  (See Altman, D. and Mascarenhas, A. K. (2016), New competencies for the 21st century dental public health specialist. Journal of Public Health Dentistry, 76: S18–S28. doi:10.1111/jphd.12190):

  1. Manage oral health programs for population health.
  2. Evaluate systems of care that impact oral health.
  3. Demonstrate ethical decision-making in the practice of dental public health.
  4. Design surveillance systems to measure oral health status and its determinants
  5. Communicate on oral and public health issues.
  6. Lead collaborations on oral and public health issues.
  7. Advocate for public health policy, legislation, and regulations to protect and promote the public’s oral health and overall health.
  8. Critically appraise evidence to address oral and public health issues for individuals and populations.
  9. Conduct research to address oral and public health problems.
  10. Integrate the social determinants of health into dental public health practice.

      The dental public health training program at the University of Iowa fulfills all of the educational requirements for dentists wishing to complete the certifying examination given by the American Board of Dental Public Health to become specialists (https://www.aaphd.org/abdph). The graduate program in dental public health offers advanced training for both dentists and dental hygienists who are interested in careers in dental academic settings or dental public health administration. The program requires two years of full-time study and culminates in the awarding of a Master of Science (M.S.) degree in dental public health. The training program places an emphasis on research and includes the preparation and defense of a master's thesis. A minimum of 40 semester hours of coursework is required, including several electives. Most required courses are taken within the College of Dentistry, but some required courses and elective courses are taken through the Colleges of Public Health, Medicine, Education, Business Administration or Liberal Arts.

    Graduates of the M.S. program in dental public health typically take teaching positions in dental schools in departments of community dentistry or dental hygiene, or administrative positions in local or state health departments, public health agencies, foundations, or community health centers. 

     A unique feature of the graduate program in Dental Public Health at The University of Iowa is its location at the College of Dentistry.  This provides students the opportunity to maintain their identity with the dental profession while studying a multidisciplinary subject.  The program gives graduate students many opportunities to learn through participation in the teaching, administrative, or research aspects of the department's ongoing programs and projects in cooperation with a variety of community agencies off campus. 

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

I am an international applicant.  Am I eligible to apply to this program?

Yes, as an international student, you are eligible to apply if you have a dental degree from your home country.   We do give preference to U.S. citizens/permanent residents, but we have had many international students and typically accept 1-3 international students each year.  

 

As an international applicant, what examinations do I need to take?  Do I need to take the National Board of Dental Examiners (NBDE) exam?

We require scores for the TOEFL exam as well as the GRE exam.  We do not consider the NBDE exam scores in our admissions process, so there is no need to take that exam.

 

What are the minimum scores that I need for the TOEFL and GRE exams?

Admission to the Graduate Program in Dental Public Health has higher requirements for the TOEFL and GRE test scores than does the University of Iowa in general. The program also requires evidence of strong English writing skills prior to admission.  Because our program requires a great deal of reading and writing, we do strongly consider the TOEFL total score and TOEFL writing score in our admissions decisions.  Successful applicants generally have TOEFL total scores of 100 or higher in the IBT, and writing scores in the mid-20s.  GRE Verbal scores are also important in our admissions decisions.  In general, successful applicants have GRE Verbal scores of 150 or higher on the GRE Revised General Test or 450 or higher on the GRE General Test (taken prior to August 1, 2011).

Information regarding the University of Iowa requirements can be found here: http://grad.admissions.uiowa.edu/graduate-programs/english-requirements-admission-graduate-college . Newly admitted graduate students who present TOEFL scores below 600 on the PBT or below 100 on the IBT are required to complete an English Proficiency Evaluation on campus before their first registration for classes. International English Language Testing System (IELTS) results may be used to satisfy the English-language requirement (in place of the TOEFL exam).

 

What are the costs of attending the program?  What are the financial requirements?

International students are charged tuition as non-residents.  That is, international students are not considered as residents of the state of Iowa, and thus do not qualify to receive resident tuition unless they have a formal assistantship.  For the 2021-22 academic year, non-resident tuition and fees for full-time graduate students is about $31,000.  Living expenses and other costs are approximately $1,230 per month, so that the total cost of attendance is over $46,000 per academic year (fall and spring semesters).  More information about the cost of attendance can be found here:  http://grad.admissions.uiowa.edu/dental-public-health-estimated-costs

International students are required to provide evidence of adequate support to cover the costs of one full year of study at The University of Iowa.  This must be done before a certificate of Eligibility (I‐20 or DS‐2019) can be issued.  More information about this requirement can be found here: http://grad.admissions.uiowa.edu/academics/financial-statement-requirement-international-students

 

Are international students eligible for graduate assistantships or internships?

Yes. However, we do not consistently have assistantships available for our students.  These assistantships are usually the result of faculty having research grants that can offer assistantships to international students.   These research grants are unpredictable and thus, so are graduate assistantships.  Applicants should therefore not count on receiving any support once enrolled in our program.

 

Does the Dental Public Health Program at the University of Iowa have a separate residency program?

No, we do not have a separate residency program meant to follow an MPH degree; rather, ours is a two-year MS degree program that includes a residency component.  Specifically, our program is a two-year program that includes formal coursework in biostatistics, epidemiology, health care policy and management, environmental health and behavioral sciences, as well as a field experience component.  This course of study fulfills the requirements set forth by the American Board of Dental Public Health for certification.  Thus, upon completion of our program, graduates are educationally qualified to take the ABDPH exam and become board-certified in Dental Public Health, with no need to complete a separate residency.  Our program also requires completion of a thesis project that requires the student to complete a significant research project and complete a written thesis describing the research.

 

Does the Dental Public Health Program at the University of Iowa have a certificate program?

No.  The program leads to a Master of Science (MS) in Dental Public Health, and does not offer a certificate or have a certificate-only option.

 

What are the minimum requirements to complete the MS degree in Dental Public Health?  How long does the program take to complete? 

The program requires completion of a minimum of 40 semester hours of academic credit, as well as completion of a thesis based on original research.  The program also requires successful completion of a comprehensive examination after completing the first year of the program.  The program is designed be completed in about 22 months (e.g., begin July 1, 2022 and graduate in early May, 2024), but most students require an additional summer session to complete the thesis, so that typical time to complete the program is 25 months.  A complete description of the program, including course requirements can be found here: Dental Public Health Graduate Program | College of Dentistry and Dental Clinics - The University of Iowa (uiowa.edu).

 

Are there opportunities to take additional or elective courses?

Yes.  Students may take elective courses from several of the colleges within the University of Iowa according to their individual needs and interests.  Previous students have taken courses from the Colleges of Public Health, Education, Liberal Arts and Sciences and the Tippie College of Business. 

 

Is there any travel required as part of the Dental Public Health program? 

Yes, some travel is required as part of the field experience component of the program.  Students are responsible for their own travel to the various field experience sites and will need to arrange individual or commercial transportation.  It should be noted that individual students can choose from a variety of field experience sites, so that consideration can be given to students’ transportation options when choosing a specific site.

 

I have a dental degree from a non-U.S. institution.  Will I be able to practice dentistry in Iowa or be able have some clinical experiences?  Are there any clinical requirements for the program?

Without a U.S. dental degree, you are not eligible for licensure in the state of Iowa, or in most U.S. states.  Completion of the M.S. program in Dental Public Health also will not enable you to obtain a license in Iowa or most other states in the U.S.  The program does not prepare students for clinical practice.

The program does not have any clinical requirements, but students in the program may be able to have some clinical experiences in the College of Dentistry or through College of Dentistry-affiliated programs.  To do so, the student must obtain a Resident’s License from the Iowa Board of Dental Examiners, and make special arrangements with the program director and director of clinics at the College of Dentistry. 

 

I already have an American MPH degree – can any of my credits transfer and be counted towards the requirements for the Dental Public Health program?

Yes, it is possible for a limited number of credits to transfer and be accepted by the program.  However, we encourage students to re-take certain core public health courses (e.g., epidemiology, biostatistics) at the University of Iowa, particularly if some time has passed since the earlier coursework was completed, in order to be sure that students have a solid foundation in these areas.

 

Does the University of Iowa offer a PhD in Dental Public Health?

Yes. The University of Iowa College of Dentistry houses an Oral Sciences PhD program, where there are both “basic science” and “Dental Public Health” emphases.  Thus, it is possible to pursue a PhD with a Dental Public Health emphasis at the University of Iowa.    Information about the Oral Sciences PhD program can be found here:  Oral Science Graduate Program | College of Dentistry and Dental Clinics - The University of Iowa (uiowa.edu)

 

What are my chances of being admitted- how many people does the program accept?

We typically accept 3-4 new students each year and that we usually have 10-15 applicants.  We have had many international students, and typically 1-3 of our new students each year are international students.

 

How and when can I apply to the program?

The application deadline is November 1 each year to allow the student to begin the program in late June of the following year.  This early deadline is to allow time for an interview (which is usually done via telephone), and obtaining a visa to allow international students to come to the United States.

The application can be made on-line or using paper forms that can be downloaded.  Note that GRE and TOEFL exam scores along with academic transcripts should be sent to the University of Iowa Admissions Office, while letters of recommendation and a second copy of academic transcripts should be sent to the Department of Preventive & Community Dentistry.  Information about the application process, including links to the on-line application system and downloadable applications, can be found here: http://grad.admissions.uiowa.edu/apply

 

Who do I contact if I have more questions about the graduate program in Dental Public Health?

Please contact the program director, Dr. John Warren, if you have additional questions.  His e-mail address is john-warren@uiowa.edu.

I am a dental hygienist with a Bachelor’s degree.  Am I eligible to apply to this program?

Yes, dental hygienists with Bachelor’s degrees are eligible to be admitted to the program. We do give some preference to dentists, but we have had several dental hygienists complete the program and have current students who are dental hygienists.  It should be noted that dental hygienists completing the program are not eligible for certification by the American Board of Dental Public Health.  

 

Do I need to take any entrance examinations?  If so, what examinations do I need to take? 

We require scores for the GRE exam, but for dentists we can accept scores from the DAT exam as a substitute for GRE scores. 

 

Is it possible to be a part-time student in the program?  If so, how is a part-time program structured?

Yes, it is possible to be a part-time student, and the program does allow a small number of part-time students.  There is no specific “part-time track”; rather, the program director will develop a plan of study for individual part-time students based on their needs and course offerings.

 

What are the costs of attending the program?  What are the financial requirements?

The University of Iowa has two tiers of tuition – one for residents of the state of Iowa and one for non-residents, with non-residents paying a higher rate.  For the 2021-22 academic year, non-resident tuition and fees for full-time graduate students is about $31,000.  Living expenses and other costs are approximately $1,230 per month, so that the total cost of attendance is over $46,000 per academic year (fall and spring semesters).  More information about the cost of attendance can be found here:  http://grad.admissions.uiowa.edu/dental-public-health-estimated-costs

For residents of the state of Iowa, the corresponding tuition and fees for 2021-22 are about $11,900 for the academic year (fall and spring semesters), and the total cost of attendance including living expenses is just over $27,250.  Students who have assistantships or fellowships qualify for the resident tuition rates. 

 

Are there any graduate assistantships or fellowships?

Yes. However, we do not consistently have assistantships available for our students.  These assistantships are usually the result of faculty having research grants that can offer assistantships to international students.   These research grants are unpredictable and thus, so are graduate assistantships.  Applicants should therefore not count on receiving any support once enrolled in our program.

 

Does the Dental Public Health Program at the University of Iowa have a separate residency program?

No, we do not have a separate residency program meant to follow an MPH degree; rather, ours is a two-year MS degree program that includes a residency component.  Specifically, our program is a two-year program that includes formal coursework in biostatistics, epidemiology, health care policy and management, environmental health and behavioral sciences, as well as a field experience component.  This course of study fulfills the requirements set forth by the American Board of Dental Public Health for certification.  Thus, upon completion of our program, graduates are educationally qualified to take the ABDPH exam and become board-certified in Dental Public Health, with no need to complete a separate residency.  Our program also requires completion of a thesis project that requires the student to complete a significant research project and complete a written thesis describing the research.

 

Does the Dental Public Health Program at the University of Iowa have a certificate program?

No.  The program leads to a Master of Science (MS) in Dental Public Health, and does not offer a certificate or have a certificate-only option.

 

What are the minimum requirements to complete the MS degree in Dental Public Health?  How long does the program take to complete? 

The program requires completion of a minimum of 40 semester hours of academic credit, as well as completion of a thesis based on original research.  The program also requires successful completion of a comprehensive examination after completing the first year of the program.  The program is designed be completed in about 22 months (e.g., begin July 1, 2022 and graduate in early May, 2024), but most students require an additional summer session to complete the thesis, so that typical time to complete the program is 25 months. A complete description of the program, including course requirements can be found here: Dental Public Health Graduate Program | College of Dentistry and Dental Clinics - The University of Iowa (uiowa.edu).

 

Are there opportunities to take additional or elective courses?

Yes.  Students may take elective courses from several of the colleges within the University of Iowa according to their individual needs and interests.  Previous students have taken courses from the Colleges of Public Health, Education, Liberal Arts and Sciences and the Tippie College of Business. 

 

Is there any travel required as part of the Dental Public Health program? 

Yes, some travel is required as part of the field experience component of the program.  Students are responsible for their own travel to the various field experience sites and will need to arrange individual or commercial transportation.  It should be noted that individual students can choose from a variety of field experience sites, so that consideration can be given to students’ transportation options when choosing a specific site.

 

Will I be able to practice dentistry in Iowa or to be able have some clinical experiences?  Are there any clinical requirements for the program?

As a graduate of a U.S. dental school you may be eligible for regular licensure in the state of Iowa, depending on the successful completion of certain regional dental board examinations.  Currently, the Iowa Board of Dental Examiners accepts the results of the CRDTS for recent graduates.  If you already are licensed in another state for a period of three years, The State of Iowa also does allow licensure by credential.  Information about licensure in the state of Iowa can be found at the Iowa Board of Dental Examiners website: Iowa Dental Board

Alternatively, as a U.S. dental graduate, you can obtain a Resident’s License from the Iowa Board of Dental Examiners, which would allow you to practice in the College of Dentistry or at College of Dentistry-affiliated programs. To do this, the student needs to make special arrangements with the program director and director of clinics at the College of Dentistry.

It should be stated that, in general, residents and graduate students enrolled in graduate programs at the College of Dentistry are not permitted to practice outside of the College (i.e., engage in “moonlighting”); however, exceptions to this policy are sometimes made for part-time students.

 

I already have a MPH degree – can any of my credits transfer and be counted towards the requirements for the Dental Public Health program?

Yes, it is possible for a limited number of credits to transfer and be accepted by the program.  However, we encourage students to re-take certain core public health courses (e.g., epidemiology, biostatistics) at the University of Iowa, particularly if some time has passed since the earlier coursework was completed, in order to be sure that students have a solid foundation in these areas.

 

Does the University of Iowa offer a PhD in Dental Public Health?

Yes. The University of Iowa College of Dentistry houses an Oral Sciences PhD program, where there are both “basic science” and “Dental Public Health” emphases.  Thus, it is possible to pursue a PhD with a Dental Public Health emphasis at the University of Iowa.    Information about the Oral Sciences PhD program can be found here:  Oral Science Graduate Program | College of Dentistry and Dental Clinics - The University of Iowa (uiowa.edu)

 

What are my chances of being admitted- how many people does the program accept?

We typically accept 3-4 new students each year and that we usually have 10-15 applicants.  We give strong preference to U.S. dental graduates, and our student body is a balanced mix of U.S. and international students.

 

How and when can I apply to the program?

The application deadline is March 1 each year to allow the student to begin the program in late June of that year.  Because we do also accept international students whose application deadline is earlier, we strongly encourage U.S. applicants to apply well before the deadline. 

The application can be made on-line or using paper forms that can be downloaded.  Note that GRE/DAT exam scores along with academic transcripts should be sent to the University of Iowa Admissions Office, while letters of recommendation and a second copy of academic transcripts should be sent to the Department of Preventive & Community Dentistry.  Information about the application process, including links to the on-line application system and downloadable applications, can be found here: http://grad.admissions.uiowa.edu/apply

 

Who do I contact if I have more questions about the graduate program in Dental Public Health?

Please contact the program director, Dr. John Warren, if you have additional questions.  His e-mail address is john-warren@uiowa.edu.

Curriculum

The Dental Public Health Master of Science Program is two-year program, consisting of 4 semesters and 2 summer sessions (at the beginning of the first year, and between the 1st and 2nd years).  The M.S degree requires a minimum of 40 semester hours, with most of those hours in required courses; however, there are opportunities for elective courses beyond the minimum requirement.  A plan of study is developed for each student when they begin the program, and typically, the first year is more heavily weighted with courses than the second – this allows for more time available to complete the required thesis project during the second year. 

 

Some courses in the Dental Public Health Curriculum are offered each semester, but many are only offered one session per year or in some cases only in odd- or even-numbered years.  Thus, the specific sequence of courses will vary depending on when a student begins the program.  

 

The following presents a brief description of required courses, as well as some optional and elective courses.

Required courses:

 

DPH:5000 Introduction to Dental Public Health - 2 s.h.

Science, philosophy, and practice of Dental Public Health. (Offered fall semesters)

 

DPH:5001 Literature Review Methods: Dental Public Health – 2 s.h.

Concepts and process of literature review, particularly in area of student’s interest.  An emphasis is placed on development of scholarly writing skills. (Offered fall semesters)

 

DPH:5005 Administration of Public Dental Programs - 2 s.h.

Application of general management concepts; includes practical aspects of planning, financing, staffing, implementing, operating, and evaluating Dental Public Health programs at the federal, state, and local levels. (Offered fall semesters, even numbered calendar years)

 

DPH:5006 Preventive Programs in Dental Public Health - 2 s.h.

Public health methods for preventing and controlling major dental conditions, primarily dental caries and periodontal disease; clinical efficacy and cost-effectiveness; students develop a comprehensive preventive oral health plan for a community. (Offered spring semesters, odd numbered calendar years)

 

DPH:5008 Field Experience in Dental Public Health – 1 s.h..

Directed field experience of varying length, individually arranged with public and voluntary health agencies according to needs of students and agencies. (Offered fall semesters)

 

DPH:5014 Dental Care Policy and Financing - 2 s.h.

Mechanisms of payment for health care service providers, third-party prepayment plans, salaried and public-financed programs.  Medicaid and Medicare programs, and national health insurance systems.  (Offered spring semesters, even numbered calendar years)

 

DPH:5015 Introduction to Statistical Computing - 1 s.h.

Use of statistical packages on a personal computer for data management and analysis.  (Offered in summer session)

 

DPH:6002 Research Protocol Seminar - 2 s.h.

Development of a master's thesis protocol; students identify a thesis topic, write a detailed review of the relevant literature, and outline potential research methods. (Offered spring semesters)

 

DPH:6004 Principles of Oral Epidemiology - 2 s.h.

General principles of epidemiology, including retrospective, prospective, and cohort study designs; validity and reliability; distribution and determinants of oral diseases - caries, periodontal diseases, oral cancer, malocclusion, fluorosis, and HIV infection. (Offered spring semesters, even numbered calendar years)

 

DPH:6011 Thesis: Dental Public Health - 5 s.h.

Protocol preparation; data collection, analysis, and organization; writing and defense of research.  This course is typically taken in three segments – 1 s.h. for completing the literature review and methods; 2 s.h. for completing data collection; 2 s.h. for completion of the full thesis.  (Offered each semester and summer session)

 

DPH:6017 Teaching Methods and Evaluation – 2 s.h.

Introduction to philosophies of dental education, teaching methodologies, and evaluation.  Emphasis on learning to write educational objectives, writing, and analyzing exam item data. (Offered fall semesters, odd numbered calendar years)

 

EPID:4400 Epidemiology I: Principles – 3 s.h.

Epidemiological concepts and methods; design of descriptive and analytic studies, such as aggregate, case series, cross-sectional, case-control, cohort studies; application of epidemiology to public health practice; communication and dissemination of epidemiological findings. (Offered each semester and summer session; usually taken first summer session or semester)

 

HMP:4000 -  Introduction to the U.S. Health Care System – 3 s.h.

Basic organizational arrangements of health services in the United States; analysis of social, political, psychological, and economic forces that shape health services; determinants of utilization, amounts and types of health resources available, methods of financing, government regulation, current issues. (Offered in summer session)

 

ORSC:5212 Statistical Methods for Dental Research – 3 s.h.

Descriptive methods, elementary probability, distributions, populations and samples, methods for analyzing percentage data and paired and unpaired measurement data, regression, and correlation and analysis of variance. (Offered fall semesters)  (Students may elect to take BIOS:4120 in place of ORSC:5212)

 

ORSC:5215 Research Design in Dentistry - 2 s.h.

Types of studies used in dentistry; design validity; sampling methodologies; major descriptive and experimental designs used in dental research; application of statistical tests to these designs. (Offered spring semestrs)

 

One of the following is also required:

 

DPH:5009 Advanced Field Experience in Dental Public Health – 1-2 s.h.

Opportunity to research, develop, and implement programmatic objectives with local, state, national, and/or federal agencies and organizations on an issue that is both relevant to the student and the agency; may require off-site visits to agencies or organizations.

 

DPH:6018  Clinical Teaching Practicum: Preventive Dentistry – arr.

Practical teaching experience in Preventive Dentistry clinical setting with first year dental students.  Emphasis on clinical teaching methods, evaluation, and remediation.

 

Behavioral Science Courses:

One of the following courses is required:

 

CBH:4104 Introduction to Health Promotion & Disease Prevention – 3 s.h.

Basic concepts, strategies, and methods of health promotion and disease prevention; health promotion in the context of public health, theories and principles that underpin health promotion; overview of policy formation and health promotion planning, implementation, evaluation. (Offered spring and fall semesters)

 

CBH:5220 Health Behavior & Health Education – 3 s.h.

Common theories of health behavior and health education and their application to varied public health problems and settings. 

 

Recommended Courses in Statistics:

The program strongly recommends a second course in biostatistics:

 

BIOS:5120 Regression and ANOVA in Health Sciences – 3 s.h.

Correlation, simple and multiple linear regression, confounding, interactions, model selection, single and multiple factor ANOVA (analysis of variance) models, contrasts, multiple comparisons, nested and block designs, and an introduction to mixed models; designed for non-biostatistics majors. (Offered spring semesters and summer sessions)

 

PSQF:6243 Intermediate Statistical Methods – 3 s.h.

Focus on using statistical methods to answer research questions and make decisions from data. General linear models (i.e., regression), statistical estimation, model building, and inference using statistical software.

 

 

Electives:

Other electives should be selected only after consultation with the graduate program director.  Some examples of appropriate courses are listed below.

 

DPH:6003 Independent Study: Dental Public Health – 1-3 s.h.

Individual study in student's special interest area, which must be approved by faculty supervisor, study design, procedures, and results are reported in a paper.

 

ORSC:5250 Current Concepts in Cariology – 2 s.h.

Etiology of dental caries, its pathogenesis and the development of preventive measures based on this knowledge. (Offered spring semesters, odd numbered calendar years)

 

PEDO:5220 Social, Cultural and Public Health Issues in Pediatric Dentistry – 1 s.h.

Students provide dental exams for children of seasonal migrant farmworkers at temporary housing sites and coordinate follow-up treatment for some of the children. Students also are responsible for putting together a final course project, research a specific dental public health issue, and present final projects to an audience. (Offered summer sessions)

 

 

Relevant elective courses also may be chosen from those offered by the University's programs in the Colleges of Public Health, Medicine, Business Administration, Education, Pharmacy, and Liberal Arts.

Master of Science Program in Dental Public Health Alumni

Zafar, Mahrukh

2021

Progression of non-cavitated carious lesions in permanent teeth and risk factors associated with their progression

Adekugbe, Olayinka

2020

Oral health status and dental service utilization of person who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer in Iowa City

Lesch, Amy

2019

Factors associated with daily sugar-sweetened beverage or fruit juice consumption between meals by toddlers

Shi, Nailin

2019

Survival of non-occlusal non-incisal restorations in older adults

D’Souza, Violet

2019

Perceived oral care needs of terminally ill adults – a qualitative investigation

Drouillard, Peter

2019

Factors associated with school-level compliance of state-mandated dental screenings in Iowa kindergarteners

Slashcheva, Lyubov

2019

Geographic trends in severe early childhood caries of Native American children

Teixeira, Erica

2018

Dentists’ prescribing practices for antibiotic prophylaxis in patients with large prosthetic joints

Oishi, Matthew

2018

A national study of dental care delivery and utilization at programs of all-inclusive care for the elderly (PACE)

Balakrishnan, Nyla

2018

Legally authorized representatives’ awareness of the oral health needs of long term care facility residents

Hirleman, Christa

2018

The impact of dental caries on the oral health-related quality of life in children

Sukalski, Jennifer

2017

Periodontal treatment needs in a Medicaid expansion population

Kelly, Mary

2016

Predictors of receipt of dental procedures by senior adults continuously-enrolled in Medicaid during their transition from community-dwelling to nursing facility residence

Patino, Daisy

2015

Oral health knowledge and dental utilization among Hispanic adults in Iowa

Mani, Simi

2015

Impact of insurance coverage on dental care utilization of Iowa children

Yaduwanshi, Kalyani

2015

Risk factors for adolescent caries incidence in the Iowa fluoride study

Avasare, Tejasi

2014

Longitudinal assessment of factors contributing MS colonization in young children

Ahuja, Vinti

2013

Evaluation of factors related to oral health-related quality of life among Iowa adolescents

Reynolds, Julie

2013

Neighborhood and family social capital and oral health status of children in Iowa

Ghazal, Tariq

2013

Prevalence, incidence and risk factors for early childhood caries among young African-American children in Alabama

Blackwelder, Aaron

2013

Association between dietary factors and malocclusion

Chukwu, Stella

2013

Knowledge of risk factors for oral cancer

among adult Iowans

Kavand, Golnaz

2012

Associations of adolescents’ and parents’ dental esthetic perceptions with dental fluorosis and the Dental Aesthetic Index: a longitudinal study

Bidarkar, Atul

2012

In vitro prevention of secondary demineralization by ICON (infiltration concept)

Kim, MyungJoo (Julie)

2012

Service learning’s impact on dental students’ attitude to community service

Jennings, Adrienne

2011

Variables associated with hours worked by Iowa dentists

Oliveira, Deise Cruz

2011

Minimally invasive dentistry approach in dental public health

Shelley, Johnette

2010

Significant indicators of intent to leave among army dental corps junior officers

Valencia, Alejandra

2010

Racial and ethnic disparities in access and utilization of dental services among children in Iowa

Kohli, Richie

2009

Oral health-related quality of life in individuals with ectodermal dysplasias

McKernan, Susan

2009

Modeling a state dentist workforce using county level data

Bhagavatula, Pradeep

2009

Fluorosis in the early permanent dentition: evaluating gene-environment interactions

Pendharkar, Bhagyashree

2009

Fourth year dental students' barriers to tobacco intervention

Rankin, Scott

2009

Dietary fluoride intake of Iowa Fluoride Study children with an emphasis on solid foods

Colthirst, Paul

2008

Utilization of dental services by foster care children in Iowa

Nair, Rahul

2008

Determinants of early childhood caries among WIC enrolled children in Linn County, Iowa

Yousef, Yousef

2008

Factors affecting Iowa family physicians' frequency of referral and other oral health-related practices targeting high caries-risk children (0-3)

Leary, Kecia

2007

School nurses and their role in the oral health school-aged children

Brister, Timothy

2006

Utilization of dental services by medicaid-enrolled residential care facility residents in Iowa

Gaskin, Elizabeth

2006

Knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of federal service and civilian dentists concerning minimal intervention dentistry

Saleh, Linda

2006

Cross-cultural education in US dental schools

Huang, Zhaomin

2004

Chinese students' esthetic perceptions of computer-generated dental fluorosis compared with those of U.S. students

McQuistan, Michelle

2004

Iowa general dentists' referral of children, 0-14 years, to pediatric dentists

Bunch, Norman

2003

Web-based infant oral health education for non-dentists

Venker, Daniel

2003

Twelve-month dental sealant retention comparing two sealant placement techniques : a retrospective chart review of an Iowa elementary school-based sealant program

Algenio, Generand

2002

 Factors affecting the use of stainless steel crowns by general and pediatric dentists

Butani, Yogita

2002

Assessment of the quality of reporting of observational studies in the pediatric dental literature

Hughes, Ryan

2002

Fee increase impact on dental participation and access in the Indiana Dental Medicaid program

Olson, David Douglas

2002

Acceptability and efficacy of chlorhexidine gel in head start children

Yamani, Mustafa

2002

Assessing satisfaction with dental care in an HIV population receiving medical care at the infectious diseases clinic, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics

Chowdhury, Jyoti

2001

Influence of intrinsic motivation on dental utilization

Gastmann, Diane

2001

Factors that influence the timing of the first dental visit

Hong, Liang

2001

In vitro evaluation of topical fluorides on different root surfaces

Mariri, Boipelo

2001

Effects of medically administered antibiotics and dietary habits on dental caries experience in the primary dentition

O'Toole, Cynthia

2001

Perceptions of barriers to dental care for elderly nursing home residents

Steinbock, Kari

2001

The descriptive epidemiology of lip, oral and pharyngeal cancer in Iowa during 1973-1997

Bhuridej, Patita

2000

Parents' perceived utility of school-based dental sealant programs: is there an opportunity cost of class time lost?

Owais, Arwa Issa

2000

A clinical trial comparing two sealant techniques : 6-month retention rates

Meeske, Jessica

1999

Factors affecting Iowa pediatric and general dentists' perceptions of school-based sealant programs

Patwardhan, Nitin

1999

Patients' attitudes toward the role of the dentist in providing tobacco education/cessation

Weber, Karin

1999

Caries in early childhood related to prolonged on-demand breastfeeding

McGrady, Jodi

1998

Access to dental care for developmentally disabled residents of group homes in the state of Iowa

Diefenderfer, Kim

1997

Junior dental students' assessments of dental patients' caries risk status

Iyer, Murali

1997

Characteristics of smokeless tobacco users in Bangalore, India

Jones, Jill

1997

Comparison of three saliva collection methods in an elderly population

Schuchard, Sheryl

1997

Factors predicting preventive dental utilization in the elderly

Wettach, Mary Halverson

1997

A comparison of smoking cessation counseling behaviors of eastern Iowa dentists who participated in COMMIT intervention and those dentists who did not participate

Harvey, Hayley

1996

Factors affecting the utilization of dental services by adolescents

Blanco, Valerie

1995

An evaluation of the burden and attitude of caregivers of Alzheimer's disease patients and self-reported oral health care behaviors

Chalmers, Jane

1995

Factors influencing nurses aides' provision of oral care for nursing facility residents

Cowen, Howard

1995

Effectiveness of two electric toothbrushes (Oralgiene and Interplak) on care-dependent residents of a nursing facility

Hamasha, Abed Al-Hadi

1995

Factors associated with missing teeth, edentulism and teeth needing to be extracted in the institutionalized elderly

Kanellis, Michael

1995

The persuasive effect of audience response on maternal attitudes toward baby bottle tooth decay

McCunniff, Michael

1995

Factors affecting the utilization of dental services by low income children

Bermel, Stephanie Nowysz

1991

Acidogenic potential of traditional Mexican-American foods

Skotowski, Mary Catherine

1991

Risk factors associated with dental fluorosis

Warren, John

1991

Family and individual factors related to acceptance of dental treatment by nursing home residents

Hosanguan, Chanchai

1988

Factors related to preventive orientation of practicing dentists in Bangkok, Thailand

Budding, Lynn Martin.

1987

The use of smokeless tobacco by a group of rural Iowa teenagers : associations with oral mucosal changes

Whitehill, James Michael

1985

Spouse concordance for measures of dental health

Swett, Lisa

1983

Utilization of dental services : the Sac and Fox Indians, Tama, Iowa

Jones, Rhys

1981

Continuity of care in the Linn County Dental Health Center

Townsend, Bradley

1982

Iowa survey of oral health : periodontal aspects of the adult population

Hunt, Ronald

1982

Diffusion of a dental innovation : pit and fissure sealants

Jackson, Peggy Anne

1981

The health beliefs of the elderly : a comparative study of utilizers and nonutilizers of preventive community health nursing services

Morris, Martha

1980

Factors affecting utilization of a preventative health clinic for the elderly

Spence, Catherine J.

1977

A study of demographic characteristics of selected participants and their descriptions of dental health

Beedle, George

1975

Psycho-social variables as predictors of an improved oral health state in fourth grade students following an oral health instructional sequence

Chukwuebuka Ogwo

2021

Dental caries prevalence, incidence,  trajectories and associated factors among Iowa young adults

Paula Ortega-Verdugo

2019

Two-step selective caries removal of extensive lesions: Treatment decision factors, success and cost-effectiveness

Reem Oweis

2018

Associations between fluoride intake and bone outcomes and associations between dental fluorosis and bone outcomes

Tariq Ghazal

2017

Prevalence, incidence and risk factors for dental caries in preschool and school-aged African-American children: a prospective cohort study

Astha Singhal

2015

Impact of California’s elimination of Medicaid adult dental coverage on emergency department visits for dental problems: A quasi-experimental approach

Susan McKernan

2012

Dental service areas: methodologies and applications for the evaluation of access to care

Elham Kateeb

2012

Factors related to the use of atraumatic restorative treatment (art) in pre and post-pediatric dentistry programs and in pediatric dentistry practices in the U.S.

Yousef, Yousef

2011

Medical professionals' oral health knowledge, attitudes and related practices performed for high caries-risk children

Chankanka, Oitip

2010

Dietary intake and dental caries in children

Chi, Donald

2009

The impact of chronic condition status, chronic condition severity and other factors on access to dental care for Medicaid-enrolled children in Iowa

Hong, Liang

2004

The association of diffuse opacities of dental enamel with amoxicillin use during early childhood

Weber, Karin

2003

A comparison of the effectiveness of three educational intervention in the prevention of Early Childhood Caries

Bhuridej, Patita

2003

Treatment outcomes of sealants on first permanent molars: natural history, survivorship, and cost-utility analysis

Kolker, Justine

2003

The natural history of teeth restored with large amalgam or crown restorations: factors associated with subsequent treatment, the timing of subsequent treatment and the costs associated with treatment selection